Common git commands and their explanations

02 March 2023 240 Reading time: 3 minute

I wanted to inform you with a detailed blog post about frequently used git commands and their explanations.

Introduction to Git

Git is a distributed version control system that allows developers to track changes to their codebase over time. It was created by Linus Torvalds in 2005 and has since become one of the most widely used version control systems in software development.

Git allows developers to keep track of changes to their codebase, collaborate with other developers, and maintain different versions of their codebase. With Git, developers can work on different parts of a codebase simultaneously, merge changes made by different developers, and revert to previous versions of the codebase if necessary.

In this post, we'll cover some of the most commonly used Git commands and their explanations.

Git Commands

1. git init

The git init command is used to initialize a new Git repository. This command creates a new directory with a .git subdirectory, which contains all of the necessary files and metadata for Git to function.

Example:

$ git init myproject

2. git add

The git add command is used to stage changes to the codebase. This command adds files or changes to the staging area, which prepares them for committing.

Example:

$ git add myfile.txt

3. git commit

The git commit command is used to save changes to the codebase. This command creates a new commit with a message describing the changes that were made. Example:

$ git commit -m "Added new feature"

4. git status

The git status command is used to display the current status of the codebase. This command shows which files have been modified or staged, and which files are not being tracked by Git. Example:

$ git status

5. git log

The git log command is used to display the commit history of the codebase. This command shows a list of all the commits that have been made, along with their commit messages and other information. Example:

$ git log

6. git branch

The git branch command is used to create, list, or delete branches. This command allows developers to work on different parts of the codebase simultaneously, without affecting the main codebase. Example:

$ git branch newfeature

7. git checkout

The git checkout command is used to switch between branches or restore files from previous commits. This command allows developers to move between different versions of the codebase and work on different parts of the codebase simultaneously. Example:

$ git checkout master

8. git merge

The git merge command is used to merge changes from one branch into another. This command allows developers to combine changes made by different developers into a single branch. Example:

$ git merge newfeature

9. git clone

The git clone command is used to create a copy of an existing Git repository. This command allows developers to work on a codebase without affecting the original codebase. Example:

$ git clone https://github.com/myproject.git

Conclusion Git is a powerful tool for managing changes to a codebase over time. By using Git commands like git init, git add, git commit, git status, git log, git branch, git checkout, git merge, and git clone, developers can keep track of changes to their code, collaborate with other developers, and maintain different versions of their codebase.

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